Removing Ovaries Increases Risks of Parkinson's Disease, Cognitive Decline and Coronary Artery Disease

Removal of the ovaries at the time of hysterectomy for a woman who is still ovulating puts a woman at risk for certain diseases, while reducing the risk of ovarian cancer by about 98%. It has now been shown that losing both ovaries will increase a woman's risk of Parkinson's disease, increase her risk of declining cognitive function and increase her risk of fatal coronary artery disease. It is true that the risks of these conditions can be reduced by restoring natural estrogen use with the use of estrogen supplementation. But the fears about the risks of estrogen have driven many women away from appropriate estrogen supplementation after premenopausal ovarian removal.  As with other surgical decisions, women need to discuss with their providers their overall health, when making those final decisions regarding whether to elect to remove ovaries at the time of a hysterectomy.

More on Age of Menopause, See the Book Making Peace With Change

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